Ride Em Cowboy

horse

Years ago, one of the things I enjoyed doing in the summer was horseback riding.  There was a stable that was located in the country, but in close proximity to the city, that rented horses on an hourly basis for trail rides on weekends. When I wasn’t swimming or playing baseball, I went on a morning breakfast ride at 6:00 A.M. You rode your horse for half an hour until you came to an old diner. Then you hitched your horse and had a hearty breakfast. Then you rode back, and returned the horse. At that early hour the ride was invigorating and the scenery beautiful.

A young lady my age continually bugged me to take her along. Although I liked to go alone, I found it very difficult to turn her down. She had the face of a young Liz Taylor and the body of a goddess. Finally, I succumbed to her relentless pressure and invited her along for the breakfast ride.

She told me she was a skilled rider and had ridden many times. When she approached her horse I knew immediately that she had never been near a horse before. I asked her if she was positive she wanted to go riding and she said she was. I was hoping she would “chicken out” at the last minute, but no, she was game and determined enough to see it through. I had to admire her “chutzpah.”

After helping her mount her horse, I started to lead the way out of the corral. After fifty feet or so I turned my head and she wasn’t there. Her horse hadn’t budged an inch and it didn’t look like it was going to. I circled back and asked her what the problem was. She asked me quite bluntly, “How do you make a horse go? Feeling a little irked because she had fibbed about her riding ability; without cracking a smile I told her to press the starter button. With a puzzled look, she asked me where it was located. I responded that she had to lean forward in the saddle and press the bump on the top of his right foreleg.

She leaned over, pressed the button and the horse took off as if he had a burr under his saddle. Her legs flew out of the stirrups but she hung on to the saddle horn and reins as her horse went into full gallop. She hung on as if her life depended on it and at that time I think it did.

I dug my heels into my horse’s flanks and took off after them. Don’t ask me what I had in mind because I definitely wasn’t a cowboy and I didn’t have a rope handy.

Fortunately, my horse was faster than hers, so I was able to overtake them. If there had been low hanging branches along the way I would have been decapitated. I grabbed her reins and pulled gently while I roared…WHOA! Again, I was lucky because the horse understood English and a disaster was narrowly averted, when he came to a screeching halt with her still intact.

Needless to say, our little adventure was over.

After returning the horses, I cornered the stable hand and asked him how come the horse went “bonkers” when the top of his foreleg was touched. He explained that the horse was very sensitive in that area…Live and learn!

As for Lois, she never had bad feelings about the incident. She appreciated that it was an accident and that I had risked life and limb to bring her horse at bay. She laughed about the whole thing and considered it another of life’s little adventures. We still remain friends after all these years.

(image courtesy of Tanatat/ freedigitalphotos.net)

Jerry Goldberg About Jerry Goldberg

Jerry Goldberg grew up on the west side of Chicago. After high school, he was drafted in the Army during the Korean conflict. Upon his honorable discharge, he joined Local 130 in Chicago as a plumber, working from 1952 to 2000. Jerry has been happily married for 60 years, residing with his wife, Gloria, in Huntley, Illinois. They were blessed with two wonderful children, and have three grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.
When his son encouraged him to get online, Jerry replied, “What do I need that for?” But all that changed a year into his retirement, when his daughter gave him a modem for his birthday, opening a whole new chapter. Finding stained glass insufficiently fulfilling, Jerry discovered the AARP message boards and began his one-finger magic. Eventually, he became quite proficient (two fingers), starting a board called, “Jerry’s Corner.”

This board was the second most popular board on AOL. Jerry bantered with any and all, and began writing humorous true stories of his past life. The stories you see here are a compilation of most he has written … enjoy!

Jerry Goldberg About Jerry Goldberg

Jerry Goldberg grew up on the west side of Chicago. After high school, he was drafted in the Army during the Korean conflict. Upon his honorable discharge, he joined Local 130 in Chicago as a plumber, working from 1952 to 2000. Jerry has been happily married for 60 years, residing with his wife, Gloria, in Huntley, Illinois. They were blessed with two wonderful children, and have three grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.
When his son encouraged him to get online, Jerry replied, “What do I need that for?” But all that changed a year into his retirement, when his daughter gave him a modem for his birthday, opening a whole new chapter. Finding stained glass insufficiently fulfilling, Jerry discovered the AARP message boards and began his one-finger magic. Eventually, he became quite proficient (two fingers), starting a board called, “Jerry’s Corner.”

This board was the second most popular board on AOL. Jerry bantered with any and all, and began writing humorous true stories of his past life. The stories you see here are a compilation of most he has written … enjoy!

Smiles For All