The Queen Of Kool-Aid

kool-aid

My son, Chuck, was eleven and my daughter, Ruth, was nine at the time. Chuck approached me one day with a serious look on his face.

”Dad, how can I make some money? I have serious expenses.” I pointed out that I had just given him a raise in allowance, and he wasn’t due for another any time soon unless a miracle happened. ”What sort of miracle?” he asked with a glimmer of hope in his tone of voice. I told him he would have to do something productive around the house like taking out the garbage or cutting the grass. I could see he didn’t care for these ideas; you could tell by his grimace that he found them distasteful.

”Oh wait,” I told him. “You could get a regular job although you would be straining the limits of credibility if you tried to pass for sixteen.” He shook his head from side to side, and I could tell my suggestions weren’t being taken in a positive manner. I had one more suggestion.

”Why don’t you sell lemonade at our local teacher’s college where the tennis courts are located. The drinking fountain is broken and the players have their tongues hanging out after fifteen minutes when it’s hot out.”

Ruth is standing within earshot and she pipes up, ”Dad, that’s a great idea.” Chuck is just shaking his head and all he said was….”It’s hot out there.” Ruth gets right in Chuck’s face and tells him she’ll assist him for a percentage of the profits. She said that their mother will make the lemonade, and they’ll make a fortune. My daughter’s enthusiasm can be contagious, and it wasn’t long before my son agreed.  But you could see his hesitancy and that he didn’t have his heart in it.

The first hot day that comes along my wife makes a large pitcher of fresh lemonade and fills the pitcher with ice. She gives them small paper cups she had, puts two chairs and a small card table in the car. She drives them to the tennis courts and drops them off. An hour later my daughter is back, she ran all the way to tell my wife breathlessly that they were all sold out and she needs more lemonade. My wife makes another pitcher, drives Ruth back and then leaves again.

This went on for days and they made so much money Ruth wants to buy a wagon so they won’t pester their mother. I got them the wagon and found a five gallon jug I used for work with a spigot on it. I also bought a case of paper cups, and since Gloria was complaining about the amount of lemons they were using, I stocked up on all flavors of Kool-Aid. Surprisingly, the Kool-Aid went over better than the lemonade and most seemed to prefer it. Everything was spotless and the drink was so cold it frosted their gums.

I hadn’t played tennis for two weeks because I was too busy working overtime. Finally I had a free Saturday and decided to play tennis. As I approached the courts I saw a strange thing. Instead of the courts being occupied I saw a long line of players standing in a single file as far as the eye could see.

I approached the back of the line and asked the player what was happening. He said there were two kids selling Kool-aid and it was so refreshing he couldn’t get enough of it. He said the little girl was SO cute and she had told him that if he had eight cups of Kool-Aid, the last two would be on the house. He said he had just finished his seventh cup, his stomach was exploding but he was going to attempt to have his eighth cup. The offer was too good to pass up.

I couldn’t believe it and walked to the head of the line. My son was sprawled in a lawn chair trying not to get sunstroke. In one hand he was holding an umbrella and in the other a cup of Kool-Aid. He was drinking the profits while my daughter was working like a young lady possessed.

She was SO excited! She served the customers, made change and kept up a steady banter. I was SO proud of her I had to give her a hug. I learned the customers complained that they weren’t being charged enough so she doubled the price.

Chuck went on to become a free-lance writer who manages to stay out of the sun whenever possible. Ruth went on to become the highest grossing salesperson in the Bloomingdale’s lady’s top fashion department. I always knew she could do it ever since I saw that glint in her eye when she became…The Queen of Kool-Aid.

(photo courtesy of savit keawtavee/ freedigitalphotos.net)

Jerry Goldberg About Jerry Goldberg

Jerry Goldberg grew up on the west side of Chicago. After high school, he was drafted in the Army during the Korean conflict. Upon his honorable discharge, he joined Local 130 in Chicago as a plumber, working from 1952 to 2000. Jerry has been happily married for 60 years, residing with his wife, Gloria, in Huntley, Illinois. They were blessed with two wonderful children, and have three grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.
When his son encouraged him to get online, Jerry replied, “What do I need that for?” But all that changed a year into his retirement, when his daughter gave him a modem for his birthday, opening a whole new chapter. Finding stained glass insufficiently fulfilling, Jerry discovered the AARP message boards and began his one-finger magic. Eventually, he became quite proficient (two fingers), starting a board called, “Jerry’s Corner.”

This board was the second most popular board on AOL. Jerry bantered with any and all, and began writing humorous true stories of his past life. The stories you see here are a compilation of most he has written … enjoy!

Jerry Goldberg About Jerry Goldberg

Jerry Goldberg grew up on the west side of Chicago. After high school, he was drafted in the Army during the Korean conflict. Upon his honorable discharge, he joined Local 130 in Chicago as a plumber, working from 1952 to 2000. Jerry has been happily married for 60 years, residing with his wife, Gloria, in Huntley, Illinois. They were blessed with two wonderful children, and have three grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.
When his son encouraged him to get online, Jerry replied, “What do I need that for?” But all that changed a year into his retirement, when his daughter gave him a modem for his birthday, opening a whole new chapter. Finding stained glass insufficiently fulfilling, Jerry discovered the AARP message boards and began his one-finger magic. Eventually, he became quite proficient (two fingers), starting a board called, “Jerry’s Corner.”

This board was the second most popular board on AOL. Jerry bantered with any and all, and began writing humorous true stories of his past life. The stories you see here are a compilation of most he has written … enjoy!

Smiles For All