Pop Fly

fly

I’ve been doing stand-up for almost 5 years. I’ve been on stage dozens and dozens of times. I’ve performed in front of countless hecklers, bachelor and bachelorette parties and this one time a poor lady got accidentally locked in a bathroom and I had to finish my set while a locksmith was cutting through the steel door to get her out. All of those things are part of it, though, and I love the chance to get on stage and tell jokes to rooms full of strangers no matter what situation I find myself in.

It’s what I do.

It’s incredibly hard, as anybody who has ever tried stand-up will tell you, so when these small roadblocks get added to the equation things can spiral from good to bad to “get me out of here!” faster than you can blink an eye, but you do your time, you get your laughs, you take your lumps and you move on.

The highs are incredible when your jokes hit. You feel carried on a wave by the crowd’s laughter and enthusiasm, but sometimes one table full of audience members can make a great set feel… less than awesome.

In the Fall of 2013 I was doing a show at a comedy club on New York’s Upper West Side. I grabbed the mic at 12:10 in the morning, but before I got on stage I watched the room and noticed they were super into the show. One table, however, sat there stone-faced and unsmiling for every comedian that went up before me. It got in my head, as I walked to the stage when the host called my name, that my job was to make that table laugh.

I was laser-focused on them; which is a dumb thing to do when there are 100 other people to entertain, but that focus somehow made me more at ease and more confident. “If I can make the silent table laugh,” I thought, “the rest of the crowd will be right there with them.” And the rest of the crowd was there the whole time. They were incredible!

Except for this one table. They didn’t budge a millimeter and stared at me like I was blocking their view of the wall behind me. Here’s what I should have done: finished my time and said “thank you, goodnight!” and gotten out of there happy that I had entertained 100 other people. Here’s what I did: I talked directly to them.

They said nothing in return.

Finally, a piece of me went momentarily insane as I started in on these people fairly aggressively. I was gesticulating and trying to get my energy to a point where it couldn’t be denied and they’d have to laugh at me. I had 3 minutes left out of a 15 minute set, so I spent it talking right to them.

Nothing. Not a thing.

Finally, with a minute to go, I see one of the people at the silent table point at me and start to laugh. The rest of the silent table followed shortly thereafter. They were laughing so much I thought, “Wow! I must be the best freaking comedian in the world! I’m the only one who made them laugh!” So I took that as my cue to get the heck out of there on a high note. I slam the mic back into the stand and walk out of the room like I’m the king of chuckles.

The show ended 20 minutes later and I was standing outside the club by myself talking to a friend when the silent table made a beeline for me. The gentlemen who started the laughter led the charge and got about 6 inches away from me before he cracked up again.

“Funniest thing I’ve seen in a long time, man.” He said to me. “Thanks, I work pretty hard and I’m glad I made you laugh.” I said. “No. No. It wasn’t your jokes at all.” He said. “Oh, then what was it?” I asked.

“While you were romping around the stage towards the end your fly popped open and you didn’t notice. That’s when I saw your polka dot boxer shorts. Hilarious, man. Hilarious.”

I looked down. My fly was still open. At least I made them laugh.

About Jimmy LeChase

Jimmy LeChase is a stand-up comedian, writer and producer. He has shared the stage with the likes of Eddie Pepitone, Al Madrigal, Dave Foley and Doug Stanhope, and helped produce dozens of live shows since 2010. After relocating to New York, New York in September of 2013, Jimmy began pursuing comedy, writing and production full time.

If you’d like to check out some of Jimmy’s material, check out his YouTube page, his Twitter account or his Facebook page.

About Jimmy LeChase

Jimmy LeChase is a stand-up comedian, writer and producer. He has shared the stage with the likes of Eddie Pepitone, Al Madrigal, Dave Foley and Doug Stanhope, and helped produce dozens of live shows since 2010. After relocating to New York, New York in September of 2013, Jimmy began pursuing comedy, writing and production full time.

If you’d like to check out some of Jimmy’s material, check out his YouTube page, his Twitter account or his Facebook page.

Smiles For All