Dog Talk

dog

When I first adopted my dog I used to joke around with friends that it was like I adopted a teenager who didn’t speak English, because I know what he wants, but have no idea what he’s saying. It’s been more than 5 years now and I still have little to no clue what anything my dog does actually means. Unless he’s sleeping; which I now know means he is sleeping.

He’s also the type of dog that is very selective about when and how he will respond to any commands. Sometimes he will sit when I want him to, other times he will look at me like I’m asking him to do a crossword puzzle. That’s just the nature of my beast.

When my wife and I moved to New York City 4 months ago I was terrified of how my dog would acclimate. We’d carved out a nice life for him back home. He had a house with a yard and a tree-lined neighborhood full of squirrels to walk around in. The dog seemed happy.

My fears seemed to be valid when he spent the first two weeks here crying whenever we left the house, scratching at the door whenever we were just hanging out and getting into the trash and causing a mess; which he never did before we moved 335 miles away. I was distraught. The dog seemed unhappy.

I started walking him more. I started feeding him better food. I did whatever I could think of to make him “get back to normal,” and none of it was working. The owner was unhappy.

During our third week in our new apartment, once the dust had settled and we had settled in, I was taking my dog for a walk around the neighborhood when we passed a super intimidating Akita. I tensed up, because the dog was the size of a small car, but I looked down at my boy and he was smiling with his ears laid flat. “He’s happy!” I yelled out loud to a man who just happened to be standing there (and now avoids eye contact with me at all times). It was a “eureka” moment like the kind you read about in books with characters that toil away in a secret lab hidden inside a mountain.

I found out where the closest dog park was. Just a 10 minute walk away into a gorgeous, hilly park I found a place sitting on an acre of fenced in land. The first day we went, I was as nervous as a parent waiting for his kid to get on the bus the first time. My dog had never gone to a dog park before. He never needed to. There were always other dogs around, but they were never off leash and they never got to run.

I sucked it up, opened the gate to the park, watched as 6 other dogs swarmed my boy and then… and then… he bounded off with them like I didn’t matter. A huge smile on his face, his ears loosely laid flat to the side of his head.

The dog was happy.

The owner was happier.

I still have no idea what it means when he winks at me.

About Jimmy LeChase

Jimmy LeChase is a stand-up comedian, writer and producer. He has shared the stage with the likes of Eddie Pepitone, Al Madrigal, Dave Foley and Doug Stanhope, and helped produce dozens of live shows since 2010. After relocating to New York, New York in September of 2013, Jimmy began pursuing comedy, writing and production full time.

If you’d like to check out some of Jimmy’s material, check out his YouTube page, his Twitter account or his Facebook page.

About Jimmy LeChase

Jimmy LeChase is a stand-up comedian, writer and producer. He has shared the stage with the likes of Eddie Pepitone, Al Madrigal, Dave Foley and Doug Stanhope, and helped produce dozens of live shows since 2010. After relocating to New York, New York in September of 2013, Jimmy began pursuing comedy, writing and production full time.

If you’d like to check out some of Jimmy’s material, check out his YouTube page, his Twitter account or his Facebook page.

Smiles For All