The Band-Aid

band-aid

I’m stationed halfway down the side of the gymnasium, back to the wall, a coworker standing silently next to me. As a new teacher, this is the first time that I’ve chaperoned a dance, and I’m sort of curious about being on the other side of things. I halfway watch as a couple near the speakers hug-dances. A group of girls next to them hold hands and spin in a circle until they’re too dizzy to continue, collapsing onto each other in fits of giggles.

My coworker, a freshmen science teacher, sighs and nods toward a group of boys across the gymnasium. Inexplicably, they’re playing a game of leapfrog between the dancers. The science teacher gives me a knowing smile and heads toward them. No doubt they’ll acquiesce, then move on to building a human tower; school dances bring out the inner child in sophomore boys.

I cross my arms and scan the room, glad I haven’t had to break up any over-eager couples just yet. One of my students, a wild-haired kid with a permanent smile, spies me from across the dance floor. He waves, then decides to jump up and down, too, just for good measure. I can’t help grinning; Jonah has too much energy to sit through a 90-minute English class, but I like him anyway. He disappears into the crowd, and I resume scanning.

Moments later, Jonah reappears, the smile wiped from his face. He makes a beeline for me. Half-yelling to be heard over the pounding music, he gets right to the point:

“Hey, Ms. R, do you have a Band-Aid?”

I take a quick look at him and don’t see any blood gushing, but I don’t have a Band-Aid.

“Sorry, Jonah, no… you okay?”

He looks straight at me, completely serious for a moment; then I see the corner of his mouth begin to creep into that smile.

“Well– I need a Band-Aid because I cut my knee falling for you!! Haaaaahahaha…”

In true 15-year-old form, he then runs away, chortling, without looking back. I’m frozen for a moment, nonplussed by his audacity, and then I have to laugh. Of all the dumb things to fall for as a new teacher, a fake pick-up line from a student is near the top of the list. Jonah: 1. Ms. R.: 0.

(photo courtesy of Paul Vinten/Dreamstime.com)

Danielle Restuccia About Danielle Restuccia

Danielle Restuccia is a freelance writer in several industries, including education, healthcare, and insurance. She previously taught middle and high school English, and in her free time, she’s an avid runner and triathlete. You can follow her on twitter @DMRestuccia and check out her blog at www.daniellerestuccia.com

Danielle Restuccia About Danielle Restuccia

Danielle Restuccia is a freelance writer in several industries, including education, healthcare, and insurance. She previously taught middle and high school English, and in her free time, she’s an avid runner and triathlete. You can follow her on twitter @DMRestuccia and check out her blog at www.daniellerestuccia.com

  • TheBigMilkshake

    Too funny. Thanks for sharing Danielle!

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